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Lightning Sessions
Friday, March 9, 2018 | 13:30-14:45 

Strategies to Support Adoptive Families in Global Transition

Laura Anderson

We know that many families in global transition are formed through adoption. How does being adopted shape a child's experience of third culture living? Do they need different support from their parents and teachers than non-adopted children do? For many adopted children, their behavior under stress can be different from children without adoptive histories. Additionally, research suggests that adopted children often struggle with transitions, and third culture life usually includes a series of changes in schools and communities. Dr Laura Anderson will offer strategies for adoptive families to stay connected with their children, and manage challenging behavior, during stressful times. She will provide concrete ways that international schools can meet the needs of adopted children on school campuses.

The Adventurous Journey of Leadership

Sue Aspinall

How traveling solo through Central Asia on route from Tokyo to The Hague taught me more about leading international schools than any course.

Build a Living Community Helping Expats Involving Companies, Public Services, and the Expat Families

Alix Carnot

At the beginning was the dream of two expat women. It became a tiny company whose mission is to raise the awareness of the French multinational companies on the issues of expat families. This is the adventure of Expat Communication, the tiny company whose media permeates the French-speaking community. A brilliant example of how our expat values of solidarity and courage can lead us to go beyond our limits and transform our environment.

How Much Does Race Matter to You?

Meghan Fenn

An exploration of issues surrounding raising mixed-race, cross-cultural children in a foreign country when your race does not match your nationality. We'll be sharing experiences from the everyday, mundane comments or questions you get to the more complex sociological and emotional dilemmas we face when raising mixed-race children in a country that is culturally different to ours. Attendees will learn from each other during this empathetic and diverse exploratory session.

How to Teach a Brain to Achieve a Happy Global Life with Neuroplasticity

Birgit Kuschel and Annebet van Mameren

International life experience shapes the brain. We still underestimate how our minds and brains can help us in transition and change and the huge role they play in shaping our lives and realities. The more often we perform an action or behave a certain way, the more it gets physically wired into the brain. This fantastic adaptive quality of the brain is known as neuroplasticity. This session will help understand the steps, exercises and tools toward using our awareness in ways that promote well-being in transition and how we can use Neuroplasticity to work in the cross-culture environment for us.

The Role of Faith in Transition

Warren MacLeod

Security in one’s identity is crucial for stability in transition. To what extent does faith aid in the provision of this identity? How has faith affected the lives of those who live abroad? Warren presents an informal collection of thoughts on this topic from a variety of voices.

Is This My Problem To Fix? (Expat Guilt and Responsibility in the Developing World)

Adam Mosley


It's a question global business people, diplomats, missionaries, and nomads in the developing world must ask themselves: In the face of abject poverty, what is my response? How can we go beyond "hiring locals" and begin to mobilize effective solutions for the world's most significant problems? In this session, Adam discusses how a connected global family and a committed local tribe can join together to improve the quality of life for developing communities.
Why "Differently Wired" is the New Normal

Debbie Reber

As the mother of a differently-wired 13-year-old son (ADHD, Asperger's, gifted), Debbie Reber is on a mission to change the way neurodiversity is experienced for today's atypical children and the parents raising them. She believes neurodifferences aren't deficits in need of fixing, but rather are differences to be embraced and which come along with many strengths. This paradigm shift will only happen through talking openly about neurodiversity, confronting the stigmas that exist, and rejecting systems that don't accommodate these kids' unique way of moving through the world. In her presentation, Debbie introduces these concepts as a way to help people view neurodiversity through a more informed, positive lens.

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